Electronic cigarettes leading cause of burn cases in a Seattle hospital

A new study conducted by the New England Journal of Medicine showed that 15 of the burn cases at the University of Washington Medicine Regional Burn Center in Seattle occurred as a result of electronic cigarettes or vaporizers. These alternatives to cigarettes use a lithium-ion battery to heat liquid that is then inhaled in aerosol form.

80% of the injured patients suffered flame burns while 33% of them had chemical burns from the alkali elements in the exploding batteries.

Some victims reported becomng disfigured or losing some functionality in their limbs, teeth, and portions of their soft tissue, which includes skin, ligaments, fat, and tendons.

The United States Food and Drug Administration categorizes e-cigarettes and other vaping paraphernalia as tobacco products. However, the agency gave no indication that they would regulate these products anytime soon.

If you or a loved one have been harmed by a product that was poorly manufactured, contact an attorney at Wilson & McQueen, PLLC today by calling (800) 953-2373.

Tips for managing your ATV on an uphill drive

Sometimes, safely navigating your all-terrain vehicle up steep slopes may be too much for your vehicle. No matter how experienced you are, some hills are too steep to climb.

A tip for someone going uphill in an ATV, especially if one is having difficulty doing so, is for the driver to keep his or her feet firmly on the vehicle’s foot rests and make sure their weight is going uphill at all times. This technique will help you avoid the possibility of the vehicle losing momentum and sliding down.

If you do start to move backwards, it is important for the driver to remember to apply the brakes and step on the parking brakes. However, the driver should remember to apply the front brakes only, because applying pressure on the back brakes can cause the vehicle to flip over.

Pursuing a personal injury claim can be a difficult process, but with the legal help of our attorneys at Wilson & McQueen, PLLC in Lexington, the process is made easier. Call our offices today at (800) 953-2373 to get in touch with a qualified member of our legal team and discuss your legal options.

Former NFL player Dennis Byrd dies in two-vehicle collision

Dennis Byrd, a former NFL defensive lineman for the New York Jets, lost his life on Saturday, October 15 during a two-vehicle collision. Byrd’s career was prematurely ended when he obtained a neck injury during a game on November 29, 1992 against the Kansas City Chiefs.

According to preliminary investigations made by the Oklahoma Highway Patrol, a 17-year-old Claremont youth was operating a 2000 Ford Explorer northbound along Oklahoma State Highway 88. His vehicle veered onto the oncoming lane, causing the collision with Byrd’s Hummer H2.

Tulsa’s athletic director Dr. Derrick Gragg expressed his condolences for Byrd’s family, saying, “We extend our sincerest condolences to Dennis’ wife, Angela, their children, and the entire Byrd family. Dennis exemplified true determination, tremendous heart, and humility throughout his life. He had a tremendous playing career at [the University of Tulsa] and professionally with the New York Jets. He overcame great personal adversity after a life-altering injury on the football field. We know that Dennis touched numerous lives and will be missed by many.”

Byrd was 51 years old when death claimed him.

Samsung’s Galaxy Note 7 smartphones no longer allowed on American flights

Passengers and flight crew members will not be allowed to bring their Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphones on airline flights within, from, or to the United States under an emergency order announced on Friday, October 14. The Department of Transportation made the order in response to reports of said devices spontaneously combusting and catching fire.

The order, which took effect on October 15, disallows passengers from carrying their Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphones on board or in checked bags. An initial announcement had passengers thinking they would be subjected to fines if they tried to smuggle their smartphones inside their carry-on luggage. However, the DoT clarified that these passengers will simply be barred from entering airplanes.

Samsung already issued a recall for 2.5 million units of said smartphones due to a battery manufacturing error. An incident of this battery issue includes the Jeep of a family in St. Petersburg, Florida catching fire because of a Samsung Galaxy Note 7 left charging in the vehicle.

At Wilson & McQueen, PLLC, we are committed to pursuing financial compensation for victims of personal injury accidents in Lexington and other areas in Kentucky. Get in touch with a qualified member of our legal team by calling our offices today at (800) 953-2373 to schedule an initial consultation.